kadrey:

The 4 Essential Elements You Need For A Good Story

kadrey:

The 4 Essential Elements You Need For A Good Story

neil-gaiman:

brennanbookblog:

The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil Gaiman 
I saw Neil Gaiman a couple months ago at Carnegie Hall. We weren’t hanging out or anything.  He was reading his new book in front of a scrolling powerpoint of macabre sketches, accompanied by a four-piece string quartet.

From Australia.

Obviously.

That’s where I got my autographed copy of The Ocean at the End of the Lane, which I promptly added to an already-teetering pile next to my bookshelf.

I’ve held off on including a Gaiman book here. I’m not sure why because I love Neverwhere and The Graveyard Book, and they equally deserve to be included, but until now I’m not sure I could justly describe the dark humanity that is endemic of Gaiman’s books.

Gaiman writes the stuff of nightmares, and I don’t mean the gruesome horror prevalent in every movie theatre within a five-mile radius. I mean, the real nightmares, the ones that are too sad, too frightening, and too harrowing to admit that we ourselves have -  because to do so would be to admit that we all only had one childhood, we all only have one life, and we are all going to die. The kind of nightmare that makes B movies look like distractions. 

“Harrowing” is a great term to start describing The Ocean at the End of the Lane. A man returns to his childhood home for a funeral, and finds himself reflecting on events of his youth as he sits by a pond behind the farm of his childhood friend. When my friend told me this synopsis, I quickly threw the book in a pile of those-yet-to-be-read and forgot about it. Because reading about a guy going to a funeral isn’t high on my list of interesting plotlines. Is the book about that? No, not at all. And in a way, it’s completely about that.

The book is scary, sure. But what makes it scary is not the dark. What makes it scary is the light. Gaiman, as an adult, writes with the preserved-innocence of a child. If we have forgotten the wonder, the imagination, and the helplessness of our youth, Gaiman has been remembering it for all of us. And it is this that he includes in his books. The Ocean at the End of the Lane is the story between childhood and adulthood. It’s a story that is too scary to remember but too important to forget.

It includes countless gems of childhood wisdom, of worry, of wonder like, “Adults take paths. Children explore.”

And at the end of the book, I’m not sure what just happened. Was it all true? Was it just the fantastical interpretation of a child? But in the end, it doesn’t matter, because Gaiman is still speaking to my very core when he writes: “You don’t pass or fail at being a person, dear.”

And that, my friend, is my biggest nightmare of all.




The kind of reviews that make it worth writing.

neil-gaiman:

brennanbookblog:

The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil Gaiman 

I saw Neil Gaiman a couple months ago at Carnegie Hall. We weren’t hanging out or anything.  He was reading his new book in front of a scrolling powerpoint of macabre sketches, accompanied by a four-piece string quartet.
From Australia.
Obviously.
That’s where I got my autographed copy of The Ocean at the End of the Lane, which I promptly added to an already-teetering pile next to my bookshelf.
I’ve held off on including a Gaiman book here. I’m not sure why because I love Neverwhere and The Graveyard Book, and they equally deserve to be included, but until now I’m not sure I could justly describe the dark humanity that is endemic of Gaiman’s books.
Gaiman writes the stuff of nightmares, and I don’t mean the gruesome horror prevalent in every movie theatre within a five-mile radius. I mean, the real nightmares, the ones that are too sad, too frightening, and too harrowing to admit that we ourselves have -  because to do so would be to admit that we all only had one childhood, we all only have one life, and we are all going to die. The kind of nightmare that makes B movies look like distractions. 
“Harrowing” is a great term to start describing The Ocean at the End of the Lane. A man returns to his childhood home for a funeral, and finds himself reflecting on events of his youth as he sits by a pond behind the farm of his childhood friend. When my friend told me this synopsis, I quickly threw the book in a pile of those-yet-to-be-read and forgot about it. Because reading about a guy going to a funeral isn’t high on my list of interesting plotlines. Is the book about that? No, not at all. And in a way, it’s completely about that.
The book is scary, sure. But what makes it scary is not the dark. What makes it scary is the light. Gaiman, as an adult, writes with the preserved-innocence of a child. If we have forgotten the wonder, the imagination, and the helplessness of our youth, Gaiman has been remembering it for all of us. And it is this that he includes in his books. The Ocean at the End of the Lane is the story between childhood and adulthood. It’s a story that is too scary to remember but too important to forget.
It includes countless gems of childhood wisdom, of worry, of wonder like, “Adults take paths. Children explore.”
And at the end of the book, I’m not sure what just happened. Was it all true? Was it just the fantastical interpretation of a child? But in the end, it doesn’t matter, because Gaiman is still speaking to my very core when he writes: “You don’t pass or fail at being a person, dear.”
And that, my friend, is my biggest nightmare of all.

The kind of reviews that make it worth writing.

posted: 1 day ago
with: 2610 notes

(Source: myloish)

Buying books from authors of color (and women) send a monetary message to the publishing industry (which is, by the way, a business – not a magical art-making unicorn) to publish more of these authors, thereby giving readers more of a variety of authors to choose from. In other words, one doesn’t buy Poland Spring bottled water when they live in California not necessarily because they think Arrowhead is better but rather because we don’t have Poland Spring bottled water. Put an abundance of it in our grocery stores and you’ll see more people buying it."
— from Diversity in Publishing Matters, Whether You Like It Or Not by Wallace Yovetich (via bookriot)

posted: 1 day ago
with: 58 notes

(Source: bevsi)

posted: 1 day ago
with: 4344 notes
Let children read whatever they want and then talk about it with them. If parents and kids can talk together, we won’t have as much censorship because we won’t have as much fear."
— Judy Blume (via thelifeguardlibrarian)

posted: 5 days ago
with: 8365 notes
torbooks:

Congrats to Cory Doctorow, whose novel Homeland won the 2014 Copper Cylinder Award!

torbooks:

Congrats to Cory Doctorow, whose novel Homeland won the 2014 Copper Cylinder Award!

posted: 5 days ago
with: 236 notes

Highland Park ISD suspends seven books after parents protest their content

robinbenway:

Another day, another seven books banned at a school district. But this article stuck out to me for two reasons.

First, this quote: "Aimee Simms, another parent, urged the English Department to use classics rather than young adult books that ‘dumb down’ literature." Thanks, Aimee Simms! Always a pleasure!

And then this quote from Jeannette Walls, author of “The Glass Castle” and the keynote speaker for the school district’s annual literary festival next February: "What I worry is that in order to protect [the students], we may be taking away the tools they need to protect themselves later on." 

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: the problem with book banning in schools is not that the books are banned, it’s the reasons the books are declared “banned” in the first place. Sexual abuse, the cycle of poverty, racism, etc. are issues that kids face in their lives. When a ground of adults come together and say that these subjects are too improper or immoral to even discuss, the message they send to kids dealing with these very issues is that their lives don’t matter, that their problems are so shameful that even through a fictional lens, they can’t be discussed in a public forum with their peers. It negates kids’ experiences, and worse, keeps them from speaking up or asking for help.

posted: 5 days ago
with: 249 notes
mentalflossr:

Little-Known Punctuation Marks for National Punctuation Day

mentalflossr:

Little-Known Punctuation Marks for National Punctuation Day

posted: 5 days ago
with: 1928 notes

What we’re all really saying during Banned Books Week

randomhouse:

image

posted: 5 days ago
with: 2138 notes
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